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Stories tagged with: reformation

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  • Reformers' wisdom applied to transgender debate

    by David Roach, posted Tuesday, July 18, 2017 (5 days ago)

    NASHVILLE (BP) -- Amid contemporary discussion of transgenderism, the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation has helped resurface historic wisdom on gender and sexuality.

    While predating by centuries the modern phenomenon of transgenderism, Martin Luther and John Calvin were among Reformers to denounce those who attempted to blur the distinction between men and women -- an error dating back to the ancient world. Read More

  • Do Baptists spring from Anabaptist seed?

    by Ben Hawkins/Missouri Baptist Pathway, posted Monday, July 03, 2017 (20 days ago)

    Image provided by the Missouri Baptist Pathway
    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (BP) -- At one Anabaptist museum in Austria, visitors can see the chains with which Anabaptist women were shackled to their homes. Without their husbands' consent, these women had accepted the Anabaptist message and were baptized. Yet, in these instances, the women were allowed to live, since their husbands needed them to raise their children and tend to their homes. But they would do so in chains. Read More

  • 7 Baptist distinctives amid Reformation's milieu

    by Mark H. Ballard, posted Thursday, April 20, 2017 (3 months ago)

    Felix Manz, an Anabaptist martyred in 1527, reflects a long Baptist heritage of "bold, New Testament believers," college president Mark Ballard writes amid this year's celebration of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation. Read More

  • TGC celebrates Reformation's 500th anniversary

    by David Roach, posted Wednesday, April 05, 2017 (3 months ago)

    Photo from The Gospel Coalition
    INDIANAPOLIS (BP) -- Some 8,500 people -- including a significant contingent of Southern Baptists -- celebrated the Protestant Reformation's 500th anniversary at The Gospel Coalition's National Conference April 3-5 in Indianapolis.

    Five centuries after Martin Luther posted his 95 Theses to a church door in Wittenberg, Germany, the meeting featured sermons on each chapter of the biblical book Galatians as well as historical addresses on key Reformation figures. More than a dozen conference workshops also explored Reformation themes, including the movement's missionary legacy and why Reformation leaders weren't more united. Read More

  • Reformation's 'Solas' highlighted at NRB in Orlando

    by Erin Roach, posted Wednesday, March 08, 2017 (4 months ago)

    NRB Photo
    ORLANDO, Fla. (BP) -- The five "solas" of the Protestant Reformation were highlighted during the National Religious Broadcasters' "Proclaim 17" convention to mark the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther's 95 Theses.

    Tony Evans, senior pastor of Oak Cliff Bible Fellowship in Dallas, preached on "Sola Gratia" (by grace alone) during the NRB International Christian Media Convention, Feb. 27-March 2 in Orlando, Fla., with Erwin Lutzer, pastor emeritus of Moody Church in Chicago, addressing "Sola Fide" (by faith alone); Mac Brunson, senior pastor of First Baptist Church in Jacksonville, Fla., on "Solo Christo" (through Christ alone); R.C. Sproul, founder and chairman of Ligonier Ministries, on "Sola Scriptura" (by Scripture alone); and Barry Creamer, president of Criswell College in Dallas, on "Soli Deo Gloria" (glory to God alone). Read More

  • FIRST-PERSON: The Reformation & Baptists

    by Ray Van Neste, posted Friday, February 24, 2017 (5 months ago)

    Baptists should celebrate the Reformation, Ray Van Neste writes, noting: "Here is why: At its heart, the Reformation was a rediscovery of the Gospel." Read More

  • Reformers urged learning of biblical languages

    by Benjamin Hawkins , posted Monday, February 20, 2017 (5 months ago)

    NASHVILLE (BP) -- Discussions among Southern Baptist seminary professors about the importance of the biblical languages is nothing new.

    In fact, it's simply the continuation of a conversation that began well before the Reformation era. Lively interest in the biblical languages -- that is, Greek and Hebrew -- was "in the air" when Martin Luther called for the reform of the church 500 years ago, noted Timothy George, dean of the Beeson Divinity School at Samford University in Birmingham, Ala. Read More

  • Reformers' pro-life views recounted

    by David Roach, posted Wednesday, February 01, 2017 (5 months ago)

    NASHVILLE (BP) -- With pro-life rallies and events making headlines in the past few days, ethicists and historians have issued a reminder that the pro-life ethic has deep historical roots, including advocacy by the 16th-century Protestant Reformers.

    Reformation leaders John Calvin and Martin Bucer both condemned willful termination of a pregnancy directly while Martin Luther addressed the dignity of unborn children and the glory of childbearing. Anabaptists likewise dignified unborn life.

    Reformation leaders John Calvin and Martin Bucer both condemned willful termination of a pregnancy directly while Martin Luther addressed the dignity of unborn children and the glory of childbearing. Anabaptists likewise dignified unborn life. Read More

  • Reformers' disagreement on Christmas yields lessons

    by David Roach, posted Tuesday, December 13, 2016 (7 months ago)

    BP file photo
    NASHVILLE (BP) -- When it came to celebrating Christmas, leaders of the 16th-century Protestant Reformation were divided on whether followers of Jesus should say "bah humbug" or "joy to the world."

    While Martin Luther loved to celebrate Christmas with feasting and special church services, the so-called Reformed wing of the Reformation, led by Ulrich Zwingli and John Calvin, raised objections to such festivities, arguing believers should worship God only in ways explicitly commanded by Scripture and that a festival in December commemorating Christ's birth was not commanded. Read More

  • Why celebrate the Reformation after nearly 500 years?

    by Ben Hawkins/Missouri Pathway, posted Tuesday, November 22, 2016 (8 months ago)

    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (BP) -- Had he used a hammer, one could perhaps say that its sound would reverberate across Europe and, eventually, across the globe.

    But it's not fully certain that Martin Luther carried a hammer when, on Oct. 31, 1517, he approached the Castle Church in the small university town of Wittenberg, Germany, where he served as both priest and professor. Luther may have used paste, according to Reformation scholar Andrew Pettegree at the University of St. Andrews, when he posted a set of 95 Theses for public debate on the church door, which served at the time as a community-wide bulletin board. Read More