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Stories tagged with: noahs ark

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  • IN SEARCH OF NOAH'S ARK: Part 7 -- Hassan Baba, 'keeper of the Ark'

    by Tom Engleman & Chuck Hughes, posted Monday, June 13, 2005 (13 years ago)

    DOBI, Turkey (BP)--Following are journal entries from two men in search of Noah's Ark.

          CHUCK: After our battle with the rocky hillock, our drive is pretty peaceful. We arrive at the Durupinar site, named after a Turkish military captain who reported an unusual formation pointed out to him by a local shepherd. This is the site researched by Ron Wyatt and David Fasold, which the Turkish government formally identified as the resting place of Noah's Ark. Read More

  • IN SEARCH OF NOAH'S ARK: Wyatt's quest: Part 4; Metal detector scans 1984

    by Mark Kelly, posted Monday, June 13, 2005 (13 years ago)

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    Searching for evidence


    Ron Wyatt and his Turkish assistants pose with the pieces of broken rock that, when assembled, seem to depict the story of Noah's Ark. Photo courtesy of Wyatt Archeological Research


    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (BP)--While most experts remained unconvinced by Ron Wyatt's findings, the evidence of unusual iron content in the soil persuaded the people at White's Electronics in Sweet Home, Ore., to donate two top-of-the-line metal detectors to Wyatt's next expedition.

          Then, in 1983, Wyatt read an article about Apollo 15 astronaut and former moonwalker James Irwin, who was actively searching for the Ark. Wyatt met with Irwin and showed him what he had found. Irwin was impressed enough to invite Wyatt to travel with him on an Ararat expedition in August 1984. Read More

  • IN SEARCH OF NOAH'S ARK: Part 6 -- The Ishak Pasha castle

    by Tom Engleman & Chuck Hughes, posted Friday, June 10, 2005 (13 years ago)

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    Out of sight


    According to legend, the owner of Ishak Pasha was a brigand who robbed caravans along the Silk Road. He deliberately built his castle out of sight of the "holy mountain." Photo by Chuck Hughes


    DOBI, Turkey (BP)--Following are journal entries from two men in search of Noah's Ark. Read More

  • IN SEARCH OF NOAH'S ARK: Part 5 -- At the foot of Ararat

    by Tom Engleman & Chuck Hughes, posted Thursday, June 09, 2005 (13 years ago)

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    In the distance


    Ararat rises in the distance beyond a neighborhood in Dobi, where members of the Turkish Mountaineering Federation met to prepare for the annual "Victory Climb" of the mountain. Photo by Chuck Hughes


    DOBI, Turkey (BP)--Following are journal entries from two men in search of Noah's Ark. Read More

  • IN SEARCH OF NOAH'S ARK: Wyatt's quest: Part 2, Tantalizing evidence in Turkey 1977

    by Mark Kelly, posted Thursday, June 09, 2005 (13 years ago)

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (BP)--It had been 17 long years since Ron Wyatt first had read about the 7,000-foot site "in the mountains of Ararat" that he believed might actually hold the remains of Noah's Ark. Now his children were older, he had some money put away, and for the first time he had two weeks of vacation. Read More

  • IN SEARCH OF NOAH'S ARK: Part 4 -- Accosted by a 'bandit'

    by Tom Engleman & Chuck Hughes, posted Wednesday, June 08, 2005 (13 years ago)

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    Spanning time


    This ancient bridge, called Inhali, was built in 130 A.D. by a Seljuk tribe after the region was invaded by the Huns. Photo by Chuck Hughes


    ANKARA, Turkey (BP)--Following are journal entries from two men in search of Noah's Ark. Read More

  • IN SEARCH OF NOAH'S ARK: Wyatt's quest: Part 1, LIFE magazine

    by Mark Kelly, posted Wednesday, June 08, 2005 (13 years ago)

    Over more than 20 years, Wyatt made repeated trips to a site in eastern Turkey that he passionately believed held the Ark's remains. Trained in medicine -- not archeology or geology -- Wyatt continued to gather evidence, despite financial and governmental restrictions, and doggedly pursued a full scientific investigation of the site. Some disagree with his conclusions, but his measurements, soil samples, metal detector readings and radar scans should not simply be dismissed. Read More