Baptist Press Archive

Monday, August 18, 2003

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  • Roy Moore called 'modern-day Daniel' as thousands rally to show support

    by Michael Foust, posted Monday, August 18, 2003 (15 years ago)

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    Standing firm


    Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore told supporters Aug. 16 that "it's time for Christians to take a stand." Photo by Morris Abernathy

    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (BP)--Braving a typical hot, muggy summer day in the South, several thousand supporters descended on the Alabama State Capitol Aug. 16 to show their support for Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore and his decision not to move the Ten Commandments monument.

          Praised as a "modern-day Daniel" by one speaker, Moore, in an unscheduled appearance, told the crowd that the rally was not about him.

          "I will pass away, as every politician and every pastor will. But the laws of God will remain forever," said Moore, who wasn't listed on the program but made an appearance midway through the rally, drawing

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    Spiritual renaissance needed


    Jerry Falwell told a rally Aug. 16 that America needs "a spiritual renaissance and we need it now." Falwell was at the rally to support Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore. Photoby Morris Abernathy

    the day's loudest applause. After speaking he was led into the capitol building by bodyguards.

          Moore added that the issue is "about the acknowledgment of God upon which this nation and our laws are founded. ... It's time for Christians to take a stand."

          Two years ago Moore had a 5,300-pound monument showcasing the Ten Commandments placed in the rotunda of the judicial building, which is just down the street from the capitol. U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson has ordered the monument removed by Aug. 20, saying that it violates the First Amendment's prohibition of government-established religion. But Moore has refused to move the display and has appealed the decision to the U.S. Supreme Court. He could face fines and even jail time if the display is not removed.

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  • Rally leaders: If monument moved, civil disobedience possible

    by Michael Foust, posted Monday, August 18, 2003 (15 years ago)

    Click to download Hi-Res Photo

    Supporting Judge Moore


    Supporters of Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore held up signs reading "Thank You Judge Moore," "In God We Trust" and "No Commandments, No Morals." Many, like this supporter, held up a copy of the Ten Commandments. Photo by Morris Abernathy

    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (BP)--Could disagreement with a court ruling lead to civil disobedience, fines and arrests in front a Ten Commandments monument?

          Yes, say leaders who attended a rally Aug. 16 in support of Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore. U.S. District Judge Myron Thompson has ordered Moore to remove the 5,300-pound granite monument from the rotunda of the judicial building by Aug. 20, but Moore has refused.

          He faces possible fines and jail time if the monument remains. Moore had it placed in the building two years ago.

          "There are many who are not going to just sit back and watch them move it out," Rick Scarborough, co-chairman of Vision America, the rally's sponsor, told Baptist Press.

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  • Keyes: Role of religion in public life up to states

    by Michael Foust, posted Monday, August 18, 2003 (15 years ago)

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    Fighting uniform regime


    Federal courts are "imposing a uniform national regime of disbelief and atheism on the people of this country," former presidential candidate Alan Keyes said a rally for Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore Aug. 16. Photo by Morris Abernathy


    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (BP)--Contrary to popular belief, state-sanctioned churches and religious tests are not unconstitutional and do not run counter to what the nation's founders believed, former presidential candidate Alan Keyes said at a rally Aug. 16.

          Arguing for a radical shift in constitution interpretation, Keyes said that the founders wanted states to make their own laws in matters concerning religion. Keyes, a Catholic, was speaking at a rally supporting Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore, who has placed a 5300-pound granite monument of the Ten Commandments inside the state judicial building.

          Moore has refused to obey a federal court order to remove the monument. Read More