Baptist Press Archive

Monday, April 16, 2012

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  • In Africa, daughter's testimony leads Muslim sheik to Christ

    by Ava Thomas, posted Monday, April 16, 2012 (5 years ago)

    HORN OF AFRICA (BP) -- It used to be a brothel, the sandy house where Mike and Abbey Nettles* are raising their children in the Horn of Africa.

    When they arrived, their first act was to make the place a home.

    The second was to learn enough local language to tell people how to get there.

    'We came expecting that He was going to do something.' -- Southern Baptist worker
    "I can't tell someone how to make bread, but I can tell them how to get to my house, and when they get here, I can tell them about Jesus," Abbey said. "We didn't come to be masters of this language. We came to learn as fast as we could how to tell people about Jesus."

    And tell people they have.

    Over the past two years, the Gospel has swept through the formerly unreached and unengaged people group they live among.

    "We don't have time to waste. The need is urgent," Mike said. "So we share as much as we can, and we spend our time investing in believers who want to learn how to make more disciples."

    Berhanu* is among such believers. Though initially disowned by his family, he was later able to baptize one of his sisters -- along with 25 more new believers.

    "Since I have believed in Jesus, I know my role is to share my faith with other people," Berhanu said. "Not everyone wants to hear, but it doesn't matter. I just need to share."

    So he does, and when he finds people to believe, they start meeting in groups to study together. He finds that his people are seeking truth -- people like Sarah*, whose grandmother was a witchdoctor and father was a Muslim sheik.

    "In my house, there were always animal sacrifices," Sarah said. "My grandmother would kill the chickens to see what the guts said. Because of the Satanic worship, it was a bad environment to grow up in."

    But one day someone shared Jesus with Sarah, and she started to read what her holy book said about Him side by side with what the New Testament said.

    "What the Bible said is true. I know this now," she said. "In the past, I was afraid and had trouble sleeping. Now I have peace in my heart."

    But for a while, the decision didn't bring peace in her home. Her father beat her, knocking out some of her teeth and breaking her leg.

    She fled.

    But after years of hearing the Gospel, her father -- the Muslim sheik -- also came to faith in Jesus.

    "Most Muslims think the story of Jesus is a lie, but more and more are coming to believe," Sarah said. "When I tell people the story of Adam and the story of Jesus -- that He healed people, died for our sin and was raised again -- some say this is bad, that it is a lie." Read More

  • These Orthodox appear to be Christian, but ...

    by Ava Thomas, posted Monday, April 16, 2012 (5 years ago)

    Photo by Daniel Phillips
    HORN OF AFRICA (BP) -- "After I became a follower of Jesus, my husband would always insult me," Melesse* said. "I tried to share with him from the Word, but he said I wasn't being a good wife and kicked me out. Read More

  • Gay history law may make Calif. ballot

    by Michael Foust, posted Monday, April 16, 2012 (5 years ago)

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (BP) -- A landmark California law that legalized the teaching of gay history in California's public school might still be reversed at the ballot, months after an earlier signature drive aimed at overturning it fell short. Read More

  • Baptist group will remain on Vanderbilt campus

    by Lonnie Wilkey/Baptist & Reflector, posted Monday, April 16, 2012 (5 years ago)

    Photo courtesy of Vanderbilt University
    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (BP) -- Although some religious organizations have said they will not register as campus organizations at Vanderbilt University, the Baptist Collegiate Ministry has applied to remain a registered campus organization. Read More

  • Land responds to charges of plagiarism

    by Staff, posted Monday, April 16, 2012 (5 years ago)

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (BP) -- Richard Land, recently in the news for comments about the Trayvon Martin killing, has responded to charges that he failed to attribute the comments on air to a Washington Times columnist.

    In a statement to Baptist Press April 16, Land, president of the Southern Baptist Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission, expressed regret for the way he handled remarks on his March 31 radio broadcast.

    [IMGONLY=30339@right@140]"On occasion I have failed to provide appropriate ... Read More

  • Seminary readies for Dead Sea Scrolls exhibit

    by Keith Collier, posted Monday, April 16, 2012 (5 years ago)

    FORT WORTH, Texas (BP) -- The sound of Arabic pop music and the smell of a campfire drew a crowd of faculty, students, trustees and local media to Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary for a cultural event demonstrating the life of Jordanian Bedouins, nomadic shepherds who live in the wilderness near the Dead Sea and were the first to discover the Dead Sea Scrolls 65 years ago.

    [IMGONLY=32425@left@250]The April 11 event also gave media the opportunity to see one of Southwestern's newes... Read More

  • TRUSTEES: Former NFL QB among new faculty

    by Keith Collier, posted Monday, April 16, 2012 (5 years ago)

    FORT WORTH, Texas (BP) -- Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary's trustees elected and promoted several faculty members, including a former NFL quarterback, during their mid-April spring meeting.

    [IMG=32438@right@150]David Klingler, former University of Houston standout who finished fifth in the 1990 Heisman Trophy vote, was among three elected to the seminary's faculty. He was a five–year quarterback with the Cincinnati Bengals and Oakland Raiders

    Klingler, the sixth pick overall ... Read More

  • SPORTS: HBU hires first football coach

    by Tim Ellsworth, posted Monday, April 16, 2012 (5 years ago)

    HOUSTON (BP) -- Houston Baptist University has hired Vic Shealy as head football coach to launch its football program in the fall of 2013.

    [IMG=32435@right@310]"I am especially encouraged by Coach Shealy's commitment not only to football, but to the academic and spiritual mission of Houston Baptist University," HBU President Robert B. Sloan Jr. said. "His outstanding coaching career and his commitment to college football will be a great asset in recruiting student-athletes and coaches for o... Read More

  • BP Ledger, April 16 edition

    by Staff, posted Monday, April 16, 2012 (5 years ago)

    EDITOR'S NOTE: BP Ledger carries items for reader information each week from various Southern Baptist-related entities, and news releases of interest from other sources. The items are published as received.

    Today's BP Ledger includes items from:

    Radical.net

    Campbellsville University

    Compass Direct News

    Pastor and author of "Radical" David Platt announces new ministry

    BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (Radical.net)--"Radical" (at Radical.net), a new resource ministry, was announced by pastor ... Read More

  • FIRST-PERSON: When the pastor is a 'museum curator'

    by Thom S. Rainer, posted Monday, April 16, 2012 (5 years ago)

    Suggesting a physical change to the church building can result in heavy criticism, says Thom S. Rainer, who offers four suggestions to prevent friction between the pastor and the congregation. Read More

  • Richard Land issues open letter of apology for controversial Trayvon Martin comments

    by Art Toalston, posted Monday, April 16, 2012 (5 years ago)

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (BP) -- Richard Land has written an open letter of apology for comments he voiced about the infusion of politics into the Trayvon Martin killing. Land, president of the Southern Baptist Convention's Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission, made the apology in a letter to SBC President Bryant Wright on April 16. In response, a prominent African American pastor, Fred Luter Jr. of New Orleans, issued a statement accepting Land's apology. Luter is the SBC's first vice president who will be nominated for SBC president during the convention's June 19-20 annual meeting in New Orleans.

    Read More