April 23, 2014
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FIRST-PERSON: Alzheimer's, Pat Robertson & the true Gospel
Russell D. Moore
Posted on Sep 15, 2011

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LOUISVILLE, Ky. (BP)--This week on his television show Christian broadcaster Pat Robertson said a man would be morally justified to divorce his wife with Alzheimer's disease in order to marry another woman. The dementia-riddled wife is, Robertson said, "not there" anymore.

This is more than an embarrassment. This is more than cruelty. This is a repudiation of the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

Few Christians take Robertson all that seriously anymore. Many roll their eyes, and shake their heads when he makes another outlandish comment (for instance, defending China's brutal one-child policy to identifying God's judgment on specific actions in the Sept. 11 attacks, Hurricane Katrina, or the Haiti earthquake).

This latest comment is serious, though, because it points to an issue that is much bigger than Robertson.

Marriage, the Scripture tells us, is an icon of something deeper, more ancient, more mysterious. The marriage union is a sign, the Apostle Paul announces, of the mystery of Christ and His church (Ephesians 5). The husband, then, is to love his wife "as Christ loved the church" (Ephesians 5:25). This love is defined not as the hormonal surge of romance but as a self-sacrificial crucifixion of self. The husband pictures Christ when he loves his wife by giving himself up for her.

At the arrest of Christ, His Bride, the church, forgot who she was, and denied who He was. He didn't divorce her. He didn't leave.

The Bride of Christ fled His side, and went back to their old ways of life. When Jesus came to them after the resurrection, the church was about the very thing they were doing when Jesus found them in the first place: out on the boats with their nets. Jesus didn't leave. He stood by His words, stood by His Bride, even to the Place of the Skull, and beyond.

A woman or a man with Alzheimer's can't do anything for you. There's no romance, no sex, no partnership, not even companionship. That's just the point. Because marriage is a Christ/church icon, a man loves His wife as his own flesh. He cannot sever her off from him simply because she isn't "useful" anymore.

Pat Robertson's cruel marriage statement is no anomaly. He and his cohorts have given us for years a prosperity gospel with more in common with an Asherah pole than a cross. They have given us a politicized Christianity that uses churches to "mobilize" voters rather than to stand prophetically outside the power structures as a witness for the Gospel.

But Jesus didn't die for a Christian Coalition; he died for a church. And the church, across the ages, isn't significant because of her size or influence. She is weak, helpless and spattered in blood. He is faithful to us anyway.

We must train up a new generation to see the Gospel embedded in fidelity, a fidelity that is cruciform. It's easy to teach couples to put the "spark" back in their marriages, to put the "sizzle" back in their sex lives. You can still worship the self and want all that. But that's not what love is. Love is fidelity with a cross on your back. Love is drowning in your own blood. Love is screaming, "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me."

Sadly, many of our neighbors assume that when they hear the parade of characters we allow to speak for us, that they are hearing the Gospel. They assume that when they see the giggling evangelist on the television screen, that they see Jesus. They assume that when they see the stadium political rallies to "take back America for Christ," that they see Jesus.

But Jesus tells us He is present in the weak, the vulnerable, the useless. He is there in the least of these (Matthew 25:31-46). Somewhere out there right now, a man is wiping the drool from an 85 year-old woman who flinches because she think he's a stranger. No television cameras are around. No politicians are seeking a meeting with them.

But the Gospel is there. Jesus is there.
--30--
Russell D. Moore is dean of the school of theology and senior vice president for academic administration at Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Ky. This column first appeared at RussellMoore.com.
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