New surgery exposes 'chink' in pro-abortion armor

by Julie Borg/WORLD News Service, posted Friday, November 03, 2017 (16 days ago)

HOUSTON (BP) -- Surgeons at Texas Children's Hospital in Houston recently performed an innovative new surgery on an unborn baby boy with spina bifida at 24 weeks of gestation. The doctors removed the mother's uterus but left it attached internally and then operated on the child through tiny slits in the womb, The New York Times reported.

Image: iStock/license purchase required
Doctors diagnosed the baby's condition following an ultrasound at 13 weeks. Spina bifida is a birth defect in which the spinal column does not close completely, leaving nerves exposed. It can cause both cognitive and physical disabilities. The medical team told the parents their baby's brain stem was slipping down into the spinal column and the amniotic fluid, which becomes toxic to the exposed nerves, would likely cause more damage over time.

Initially, doctors pushed for an abortion, but the parents chose to give their little boy a chance through the experimental operation. The parents know their baby will still likely suffer some damage from the defect, but they hope the procedure will enhance his quality of life.

"We're strong believers in God, and we're at peace," the grandmother told the Times in the Oct. 23 article. "This baby is going to be so loved."

R. Albert Mohler Jr., president of Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and a WORLD board member, pointed out in his podcast "The Briefing" the contradiction between secular media's support of the cutting-edge surgery and a woman's legal right to abort her unborn baby, calling it "a form of undisguised moral insanity."

Mohler added that we should be thankful for what this surgery and the Times' reporting of it represents: "What we see here is a chink in the pro-abortion armor."

"What we see here is irrefutable evidence," he noted, "even visual as well as verbal evidence, of what it means that unborn life in the womb is a baby."

Julie Borg writes for WORLD News Service, a division of WORLD Magazine (www.worldmag.com) based in Asheville, N.C. Used by permission.
Download Story