American Idol contestant ministers in Chile

SANTIAGO, Chile (BP)--Sean Michel smiled through his distinctive, foot-long beard as he slid the guitar strap over his shoulder and greeted the crowd at El Huevo nightclub with what little Spanish he knows. The former American Idol contestant and his band then erupted into the sounds of Mississippi Delta blues-rock.

But unlike other musicians who played that night, the Sean Michel band sang about every person's need for God and the salvation that comes only through faith in Jesus Christ.

"We came down [to Chile] to open doors that other ministries couldn't," said Jay Newman, Michel's manager. "To get in places that only a rock band could -- to create a vision for new church-planting movements among the underground, disenfranchised subcultures of Chile."

The Sean Michel band recently traveled through central Chile playing more than 15 shows in bars, churches, schools and parks. The group consists of Southern Baptists Sean Michel, lead singer; Alvin Rapien, lead guitarist; Seth Atchley, bass guitarist; and Tyler Groves, drummer.

"Although we're a blues rock 'n' roll band, we're an extension of the church," Michel said. "We're kind of like 'musicianaries,' if you will."

MISSIONS-MINDED MUSICIANS

The band formed after Michel and Newman met as students at Ouachita Baptist University in Arkadelphia, Ark. While there, the two began recording and selling Michel's music as a way to raise money for mission trips to Africa and Asia.

"We were just trying to raise money for a mission trip, but we'd also seen God speaking to people through the music," Michel said. "So we were like, 'Well, maybe we need to do something with this,' and we became a music ministry. But it's always been rooted in missions and ... in the Great Commission."

Michel graduated from Ouachita in 2001, Newman in 2004. In 2007, Newman talked Michel into auditioning for American Idol. The exposure Michel received through the television show gained a wider audience for their ministry.

"The whole American Idol thing was so weird," Michel said. "We just kind of went on a whim. But the Lord used it in a big way."

During his tryout, Michel belted out a soulful rendition of Johnny Cash's "God's Gonna Cut You Down." The video of the audition went viral on the Internet.

Soon he was doing radio interviews in which he identified himself as a Christian and directed listeners to the band's Gospel-laden MySpace page. On their next mission trip to Asia, Michel and Newman found that being recognizable gave them access to venues they couldn't have entered before.

The band is now an official extension of First Southern Baptist Church of Bryant, Ark., where the musicians have long been active members serving in the music and youth ministries. Every mission trip they have taken has involved working with International Mission Board (IMB) missionaries.

"We're Southern Baptist," Michel said. "That's who we roll with."

TOUR DE FAITH

"With short-term mission trips, you can plan, but you just got to be willing for your plans to change," said Michel. When the band arrived in Chile, they were surprised to find that their schedule wasn't nearly as full as expected. Almost no public venues had booked shows, and many rock-wary churches had declined to host the band.

"The biggest barrier we had was the pastors," said Cliff Case, an IMB missionary in Santiago, Chile, and a 1984 graduate of Ouachita Baptist. "The older pastors on two or three different occasions gave excuses for not doing it. It was a real frustration in that sense."

Disappointed by the lack of interest, the band prayed for God's help. They met Jose Campos -- or Pépe, as the band came to know him. Campos works with music and youth for the Ministry of the Down and Out, an independent Christian ministry that seeks to reach the often-overlooked demographics of Santiago.

Campos was able to use his connections to book shows for the band in venues they wouldn't have known about otherwise.

"Had we met Pépe (Campos) two or three weeks before the group came, there's no telling how many shows we might have done," said Case, who met Newman at Ouachita when Case and his wife, Cinthy, were missionaries-in-residence there.

Campos booked the show at El Huevo, possibly Chile's most popular club. Playing there has given the band musical credibility among Chilean rockers. And, one Chilean church reported that a youth accepted Christ after hearing Newman talk before a show. The band already is contemplating a return tour next year.

OPENING NEW DOORS

Sharing the Gospel through their songs is only the beginning for the Sean Michel band. Their vision is to be a catalyst to help churches -- and missionaries -- connect with the lost people of their communities.

"God is not saving the world through rock bands," Michel said. "He's saving the world through the church. And it will always be through the local body."

The band wants to see churches take ministry beyond the church doors.

"If you're going to want to legitimately reach lost people, you're going to have to get out," Michel said. "Go out into the dark places. Those are the places we need to be to reach out."

The band's ministry in Chile opened new doors for IMB missionaries to reach the young, musical subculture of Chilean society.

"They laid the groundwork for more opportunities," Case said. "Now we have a network of who to talk to and how to get organized. We can focus on how to use the work they're doing so we can win people to the Lord and plant some churches."


Tristan Taylor is an International Mission Board writer living in the Americas.

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